Tag Archives: museumcollection

Home of Christmas Clubs…

Earlier in the month we featured some savings stamps books which were a great way of spreading the cost of Christmas.On Day sixteen we bring you this 5’6 Christmas Gift from the Home of Christmas Clubs Dyson & Horsfall. Dyson & Horsfall were a mail-order catalogue firm operating in Preston and a copy of their 1939 Christmas price-list is held by the National Archives. This boxed coffee pot and Kenya coffee would have been given to customers of the Christmas savings club as a token of the company’s appreciation for their valued custom. It’s made from Aluminium, however we know that during WW2 the company donated all it’s aluminium to the war effort to contribute to armaments and aluminium tea and coffee pots were replaced with ceramic products, one example of which was a commemorative teapot bearing the words “war against Hitlarism” -an example of which can be found in the British Museum’s collection. We think therefore that our coffee pot pre-dates WW2, most likely dating to around the 1930’s.

Oh Christmas tree, oh Christmas tree…

The aptly named bottle brush Christmas trees were highly popular in the 1950’s and were often used to decorate mantles or at the base of a larger Christmas tree, accompanied by a train set or tiny little winter wonderland. They were also sometimes used a centrepieces on tables and were decorated in all kinds of elaborate trinkets, ribbons and plastic jewels. On day Fifteen of advent we bring you these beautiful examples of bottle brush Christmas trees!

Good wreath!

On day thirteen of advent we thought we’d share this beautiful Christmas wreath with you. Did you know that the word ‘wreath’ means to ‘to twist’ and historically wreaths were made to represent the eternal life of Christ. We thought that was very interesting. This wreath is artificial and dates to the mid-20th Century.

Three Wise Men…

The nativity is a story that’s been being told in one form or another since 1223, so on day eleven we bring you the three wise men…we’re not sure what happened to the rest of the nativity but unfortunately they never made it to the Museum! These three pieces are made from plastic which places them most likely in the mid to late 20th Century.